Quick Stats on Adderin

Background Information and Company Claims: Finding information on the manufacturer was challenging. Their website does list two addresses, one for Adderin.com and one for KNH Online Limited (based out of the UK).

Pricing Plans (Cost): The website follows a pattern of trying to upsell a high number of bottles to a first-time customer. With a very high pricing of $74.95 per bottle for a one month supply. The price drops down to $35.99 each bottle if 5 bottles are bought at one time.

Company Policies (Shipping, Returns, and Refunds): All policies are well-defined and addressed at some level. However, that does not mean that the policies are very forgiving. A 30-day refund is only offerred if the product is damaged or defective when it arrives to you. Otherwise, returns are accepted, but shipping and handling is non-refundable, and there is a flat restocking fee of $15 that is charged seperately.

List of Main Ingredients: Alpha GPC, Tyrosine, Bacopa Monnieri, Vinpocetine, GABA, and Huperzine A

Questionable Ingredients (Red-Flags): There are no red-flags.

Customer Service Contact Information: Customers can reach Adderin through the website contact form, or phone at (727)-498-4811. No toll-free number 1-800 number was located. The website listed that their customer service line is open Monday through Friday from 9 AM to 5 PM EST.

Meta-Data Reputation: Customer reviews across our certified credible sources are average.

Notable Statuses: None.

Full Review of Adderin

Nootropics are the new health supplement rage. One of the more controversial nootropics of recent is Adderin. This supplement claims that it is a “smart pill” that can help you obtain “optimal mental performance.” There’s no doubt that the manufacturer paints a vivid and alluring picture for what this pill can do. But is there any truth to the message? Let’s take a look at different aspects of Adderin to see how it measures up.

Ingredients

Before we can discuss any other aspect of the pill, let’s look at what matters- the ingredients. According to the Adderin website, it contains the following active ingredients: Bacopa Monnieri, Alpha GPC, Huperzine A, Vinpocetine, and L-Tyrosine. Let’s break these promising ingredients down by their intended purpose.

Improved processing: Bacopa Monnieri. Also called Brahmi, this ingredient has long been used in Ayurvedic medicine to help with brain issues. It is said to increase certain brain chemicals which can improve learning, thinking, and memory, and may even be able to help prevent Alzheimer’s.

Better physical and mental energy and a sense of well-being: Alpha GPC. This compound is naturally occurring and is used as a treatment for brain trauma, such as strokes, dementia, and Alzheimer’s. It is said to increases chemicals in the brain that are involved in memory and learning.

Better memory and increased focus and concentration: Huperzine A and Vinpocetine. These ingredients combine to help the brain work better. The Huperzine A works to increase levels of acetylcholine, a nervous system transmitter, in the brain. Like the Alpha GPC, this helps with memory and learning, as well as energy and coordination. The Vinpocetine is said to increase blood flow to the brain to help the brain work better overall.

Reduced perception of stress and increased alertness: L-Tyrosine. This ingredient is actually an amino acid that is produced by the human body. It helps the mind by increasing the number of chemical messengers in the brain. This is said to lead to quicker responses, feeling more alert, and reducing levels of stress in the brain.

Side Effects

Like any supplement, the user may experience some side effects of Adderin. Here again we find ourselves wanting to look at reliable information straight from the manufacturer, but it doesn’t exist. According to other product reviews and customer reviews, the best information claims that the product can cause headaches, dizziness, nausea, vomiting, and digestive upset.

Due to the lack of information here, each user will have to take the product at their own risk. The positive thing to note is that the side effects were pretty mild and didn’t last long, according to users.

Manufacturer

Finding information on the manufacturer was a challenge. A usually reliable Google search was only able to pull up a web form on the “contact us” page for adderin.com. A small note at the bottom states the business address for the Adderin company in Florida and gives a phone number to reach them at. Another note under that shows KNH Online Limited, of the UK, to be the parent company. That’s all that is given. Not a shred more on their site or on Google.

According to the Adderin official site, the product has been compared to the fictional drug in the movie “Lucy”, received media attention, been a #1 seller on Amazon, and manufactured in an FDA GMP facility. A quick look at the fine print tells us that this product isn’t associated with any movie or media news company. It also states that the FDA has basically nothing to do with this product’s claims or ingredient regulation. Finally, the product is nowhere to be found on Amazon.

This makes it difficult to judge the product based on its manufacturer. What we’re left with at this point is a website making fantastical claims about a brand new supplement, and absolutely nothing to back it up. It also seems that this manufacturer is shrouded in some mystery.

Adderin or Adderall?

A lot of confusion has come about because of Adderin’s similarity to Adderall. Adderall is the infamous drug used to treat hyperactivity or attention deficit disorder (ADD). It’s easy to see why there’s so much confusion: the two drugs claim to do nearly the same thing. They both claim to increase focus, improve brain function, and give lasting energy. However, the two pills are not the same thing at all. Adderall contains stimulants that make the brain kick into overdrive. If you are expecting the amphetamine kick of Adderall, you may be disappointed by Adderin’s more natural take on nootropics.

Customer Reviews

The reviews on this product are difficult to process. Most supplement review sites leave this product somewhere in the middle of the road. It scores between a 40% and 70% on most scales, which means that it isn’t the best product, but it isn’t the worst.

As far as paying customers are concerned, they seem to have more negative things to say about the company than the product. Complaints of overcharging and refusal to make things right by the company are rampant. Most buyers seem to think it’s more of a scam than anything.

Some customers reported taking the capsule for weeks on end to no avail. They said increasing doses did not make a difference. Again, a lot of the users seem to think it was just an overpriced scam supplement.

Amongst all the scathing reviews for Adderin were a few reviews that claim that the product does what it says it should. Some users reported feeling like their brain was working better, their retention skills had improved, and they felt more energetic. These users reported taking only one or two pills daily to achieve these effects.

Conclusion

In the end, Adderin seems like a big gamble. The company makes a lot of claims that just can’t be proven. The company itself seems a bit suspicious, and their business methods are questionable to say the least. And while the product contains good ingredients that have real potential to boost brain power, buyers have no way of knowing how much of these ingredients the supplement contains or what other ingredients have been mixed in. Researching a different nootropic with similar effects may be the cheaper, safer, and better bet.